Joint programs

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VISITORS TO THIS PAGE PLEASE NOTE:The brief descriptions of the programs above were written based on information found at each school’s website. If the information is incomplete, out of date or incorrect, please let us know.


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Melanie Coulson, education editor
and/or
Tamara Baluja, associate editor

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Laurentian University / Cambrian College/ Huntington University
In Sudbury, Laurentian University offers a four year Bachelor of Arts in Communication Studies. The degree is a cooperative program of courses offered at Laurentian University, Cambrian College, and Huntington University. Students starting their degree at Huntington University have the option to choose a fourth-year focus in journalism, public relations or advertising at Cambrian College. Students are required to choose a fourth-year focus in either journalism, public relations or advertising. Those who choose journalism receive practical instruction and workshop courses in print, broadcasting, photo and online journalism. All students are required to complete a cultural studies or native studies component as part of the degree. Students can also enroll in a the new Honours BA program in Communications Studies.  

University of Ottawa / Algonquin College / La Cité Collégiale
In Ottawa, the University of Ottawa offers a four-year Bachelor of Journalism program in conjunction with Algonquin College and La Cité Collégiale. Students take courses at both campuses, to receive practical instruction and workshop courses in print, radio, television and online journalism, along with a series of academic and lecture-based courses to prepare them to work as journalists. Student can either complete 75% of their credits at the University of Ottawa, then transfer to Algonquin College to obtain a diploma in journalism, or they can split their time between the two institutions evenly, beginning at the University of Ottawa. Approximately 25 students are admitted to the undergraduate program each year. This program is also open to students who have already graduated from Algonquin College with a journalism diploma.  


University of PEI / Holland College
In Charlottetown, the University of PEI, in cooperation with Holland College, offers a four-year Bachelor Applied Arts in Print Journalism. Students acquire technical training and practical experience in Journalism (primarily during study at Holland College) and also receive a series of academic and lecture-based courses to prepare them to work as journalists. The program differs from a Bachelor of Journalism program, which normally has a more theoretical orientation in exploring the nature of the media. Students normally undertake one year of study at the University, then complete the two-year Journalism program at Holland College (earning a Holland College diploma), before undertaking a final year of study at the University. The final year of study normally includes an opportunity for journalistic writing either at the University or arranged through Holland College.


University of Regina / Medicine Hat College
The University of Regina, in conjunction with Medicine Hat College, offers a four-year Bachelor of Journalism program. Medicine Hat College offers the first 20 pre-journalism courses towards a Bachelor of Arts and the next two years are spent at the University of Regina, in which all students receive practical instruction and workshop courses in print, radio, television and online journalism, along with a series of academic and lecture-based courses to prepare them to work as journalists. Approximately 26 students are admitted to the program each year.

University of Guelph/Humber
In Toronto, the University of Guelph, in cooperation with Humber College, offers a four-year Bachelor of Applied Arts with a diploma in Journalism. Students receive practical skills training in print, radio, television and online journalism along with a series of academic and lecture-based classes that examine the nature and role of the media in society. Approximately 44 students are admitted to the program each year.

University of Toronto / Centennial College
In Toronto, the University of Toronto, in cooperation with Centennial College, offers a four-year Bachelor of Arts in Journalism. In addition to completing the requirements for the degree, students have the option of qualifying for a diploma from Centennial College by undertaking one additional semester in a field placement and completing a short, non-credit course on journalism career management at Centennial. Courses are taught at U of T Scarborough and at two campuses of Centennial College (the HP Science and Technology Centre at Morningside and Ellesmere and the Centre for Creative Communications in East York). Centennial courses are taken in the third and fourth years of the program, in which all students receive practical instruction and workshop courses in print, photo and online journalism as well as layout and design.

University of Western Ontario / Fanshawe College
Media Theory and Production (MTP): This is a four-year joint program in the Faculty of Information and Media Studies at the University of Western Ontario and Fanshawe College in London, Ont. Students receive a three-year B.A. in Media, Information and Technoculture and a two-year college diploma concurrently. Students take classes in media theory, such as Advertising and Society and The Global Political Economy of Information. After their first year, students specialize in one of four streams: Multimedia Design and Production, Broadcasting Television, Broadcasting Radio, and Journalism Broadcast. Admission to each of the specializations is competitive and depends on students’ performance in the first year of the program. The program is a combination of theory and practical instruction. Note: students who wish to pursue university-level graduate studies must take an additional year of university at Western or another institution to earn a four-year university degree. The MTP program is intended for students who wish to move into media-related employment upon graduation.

University of Winnipeg / Red River College
The University of Winnipeg, in cooperation with Red River College, offers a Bachelor of Arts in Communications and a Creative Communications Diploma. Generally students begin at the University of Winnipeg, completing at least 60 credit hours before proceeding to Red River, where they take the two-year Creative Communications Program. At Red River College, all students receive practical instruction and workshop courses in print, radio, television and online journalism, along with a series of academic and lecture-based courses to prepare them to work in the fields of journalism, broadcasting, advertising and public relations.

York University / Seneca College
Seneca College and York University offer a joint program which enables students to earn a Seneca diploma in Journalism - Broadcast and a York University Bachelor of Arts Degree. This program is for students who have completed two years of a B.A. program, or three years of an honours B.A. program at York University.

Comments

The University of King's College is nowhere to be found in your list of journalism schools. As the oldest university in Canada and a prominent school, I think it's only appropriate that you include it.
You'll find the University of King's College in its alphabetical place (under "U") on our list of undergraduate university programs. (King's is a major collaborator in this project - see our Law section - so we could never forget it.)
Hi there, I am a graduating student in the Media, Theory, and Production collaborative program between Fanshawe College and the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario. Students receive a three year degree from Western and a two year diploma from Fanshawe in one of four streams: Television - Broadcasting, Broadcasting - Radio, Journalism - Broadcast, or Multimedia and Design. The program is four years and has already processed two groups of graduates. You can find all of the information on UWO's website. Thanks! Elyse

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