Journalism educators may want to teach social media tools but often find it difficult given they are required to use clunky online systems for grading and communicating with students.

In a post published on Mediashift, a multimedia journalism educator Nathan Gibbs says, “These awkward systems don’t inspire creativity, enrich collaboration, or instill a passion for experimentation — all of which are required to survive and succeed in a rapidly changing media industry.”

But Gibbs has some useful suggestions about the innovative ways some journalism professors are using social media tools in the classroom.  Not every tool is appropriate for every class, but, he says,  there are undoubtedly ways in which most instructors can find room for at least some of these ideas.

Journalism educators may want to teach social media tools but often find it difficult given they are required to use clunky online systems for grading and communicating with students.

In a post published on Mediashift, a multimedia journalism educator Nathan Gibbs says, “These awkward systems don’t inspire creativity, enrich collaboration, or instill a passion for experimentation — all of which are required to survive and succeed in a rapidly changing media industry.”

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But Gibbs has some useful suggestions about the innovative ways some journalism professors are using social media tools in the classroom.  Not every tool is appropriate for every class, but, he says,  there are undoubtedly ways in which most instructors can find room for at least some of these ideas.