They are a challenge every journalism educator faces at some point — students who cut and paste material from stories on the Internet; fabricate quotes; or pad bibliographies and source lists. In this thoughtful piece, Alex Gillis, a journalism instructor at Ryerson, describes his first experience with cheating students and what he learned from it. He outlines some of the surprising things he found out about why students cheat  (it’s often the best students who cheat in an effort to get an A) and what can be done to try to stop them. The article includes links to resources from Canadian universities that may be helpful to any educator determined to stop their students from cheating.

They are a challenge every journalism educator faces at some point — students who cut and paste material from stories on the Internet; fabricate quotes; or pad bibliographies and source lists. In this thoughtful piece, Alex Gillis, a journalism instructor at Ryerson, describes his first experience with cheating students and what he learned from it. He outlines some of the surprising things he found out about why students cheat  (it’s often the best students who cheat in an effort to get an A) and what can be done to try to stop them. The article includes links to resources from Canadian universities that may be helpful to any educator determined to stop their students from cheating.

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